In Hungarian, verbs are polypersonal, which means that they correspond to more than one of the arguments of the verb: not only with its subject, but also with its (precise) object. There is a distinction between the case where there is a particular object and the case where the object is indeterminate or where there is no object at all. (Adverbians have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I like someone or something unspecified), more (I love him, she, she or she, in particular), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, us, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, him or her specifically). Of course, names or pronouns can specify the exact object. In short, there is a correspondence between a verb and the person and the number of its subject and the specificity of its object (which often relates more or less precisely to the person). The obvious conclusion is that subject-verb compliance errors should be avoided at all costs. However, almost all authors sometimes produce such errors, if you happen to produce a subject-verb match in one of your texts, although you have read and acquired all the rules mentioned here, you are certainly in good company! For example, in Standard English, we can say that I am or that he is, but not “I am” or “he is”. This is because the grammar of language requires that the verb and its subject correspond personally. The pronouns I and him are the first or third person respectively, just as the verb forms are and are. The verb must be chosen in such a way as to have the same person as the subject, unlike the fictitious agreement based on meaning. [2] [3] For example, in American English, the un expression is treated as a singular for the purposes of the agreement, although it is formally plural. In other words, with, thus, and in addition, you do not behave in the same way as the conjunction and when it comes to the subject-verb agreement (although they have about the same meaning or function). On the contrary, native speakers of English react strongly to subject-verb conformity errors (also known as Concord error), much like native speakers of Swedish react to erroneous sentences, as most Slavic languages are very volatile, with the exception of Bulgarian and Macedonian.

The correspondence is similar to Latin, for example between adjectives and nouns in gender, number, uppercase and lowercase (if counted as a separate category). The following examples come from the serbocroatic: the two noun singular phrases of each example are highlighted (the impression of fat), as well as the singular filling. The corresponding plural address appears in parentheses to indicate that it is an alternative in less formal modes of writing and speech. Sometimes we have a number of topics that are mixed – the singular and the plural. In the informal language, the verb then corresponds to the nearest subject. Look at these examples: Here are some special cases for the subject-verb agreement in English: If you were to argue that this is in fact what she managed to escape from what the subject is, you may be right, but that would not change the fact that the clauses adopt a singular convergence, because as she succeeded, escaping is also a clause. . .

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